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Divorce: how long does it take?

Kim Kardashian separated from Kris Humphries after 72 days of marriage, but 365 days later, the divorce proceedings are still inching towards trial.

As reported in the Vancouver Sun:

Superior Court Judge Stephen Moloney told attorneys for Kardashian and NBA player Kris Humphries to return to court in mid-February to set a trial date to either dissolve or annul the couple’s 72-day marriage. He didn’t set a deadline for depositions and other pre-trial investigation to be completed, but indicated a trial could be held early next year if it is ready by Feb. 15.

 So how long does it take to get a divorce?

Legal time requirements for divorce are different in different countries.  In Canada, the Divorce Act sets out that a court can grant a divorce if there has been a breakdown of the marriage.    A breakdown of a marriage is described in Section 8 of the Divorce Act as:

8(2) Breakdown of a marriage is established only if

  • (a) the spouses have lived separate and apart for at least one year immediately preceding the determination of the divorce proceeding and were living separate and apart at the commencement of the proceeding; or
  • (b) the spouse against whom the divorce proceeding is brought has, since celebration of the marriage,
    • (i) committed adultery, or
    • (ii) treated the other spouse with physical or mental cruelty of such a kind as to render intolerable the continued cohabitation of the spouses.

So, in Canada, you have to have lived separate and apart from your estranged spouse for one year prior to a divorce being granted unless there has been adultery or cruelty (as a note, if you are proceeding on adultery or cruelty there are specific evidentiary requirements that must be met).  After the year of separation, the process of getting the actual divorce usually between a couple of weeks and a couple of months if it is uncontested.  A breakdown of the timeline and steps can be found on JP Boyd’s family law resource.

Also, the Divorce Act sets out that a court in a province may only grant a divorce if one of the spouses has been ordinarily residence in that province for one year immediately preceding the commencement of divorce proceedings.

If a divorce can be finalized after one year of separation, why are my divorce proceedings entering year three?

The answer is, quite simply, if you agree on everything, and you file all of the right paper work, correctly filled out, at the  correct time and in the correct place, your divorce will move along quickly.

As summarized by the Ministry of Justice:

A divorce is relatively easy to get if your reason for the divorce is that you have been separated for a year or more and:

  • you both agree that you want a divorce, and you are not asking the court to settle any other issues, such as custodyaccess or support (this is usually called an “uncontested” divorce), or
  • you both agree that you want a divorce and agree on all other details, such as custody and support (this is called a “joint divorce action”), or
  • you alone are asking for a divorce and for the court to settle other issues, such as custody and support, and your spouse does not dispute the divorce or any of the issues.

A divorce is more complicated to get if your reason for the divorce is cruelty or adultery or your spouse decides to dispute the divorce or any other issues. This is often called a “defended” divorce.

It is when there are issues of disagreement that a divorce can span out longer periods of time.  For example, in the 2008 British Columbia Court of Appeal decision, Laxton v. Coglon, deals with a case in which divorce proceedings had been ongoing since 2001.

New Yorker Cartoon by Tom Cheney

 

Each family is different.  The length of time it takes to resolve the issues involved in your divorce will vary from others you know.

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