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Divorce: Shouts & Murmers

 The last few weeks have been full of interesting news items about divorce.  Here are a couple to check out:

Nick Downes - Published in the New Yorker January 17, 2000

The New Yorker:

In a recent “Shouts & Murmers” Cora Frazier wrote about divorcing in exchange for working  from home and getting rid of the daily commute.  It is a hillarious read, especially on your daily commute to work (after a morning of bickering with your spouse):
5% of [Americans] surveyed said they would actually be willing to divorce their spouse if that meant they could stop commuting and work from home instead.

You see, this was the choice the survey offered me, as I understood it: I could continue to take a forty-seven-minute train ride (or a thirty-eight-minute ferry ride) and a twelve-minute subway ride to and from work every day while remaining your wife, or I could work from home and cease to be married to you. I have chosen the latter.

You probably have a few questions, as I did. For example, will this home be our home, where you also live? Given the fact that we will no longer be husband and wife, this is a complication. I asked the surveyor this question, but she had already moved on to “Would you give up manicures if it meant you didn’t have to commute?” (No.)


Perez Hilton always posts interesting tidbits about celebrity divorces.  Kim Kardashian’s divorce is proceeding with depositions, and Kris Humprhies is set to testify.  Winnie Cooper is getting a divorce (not from Kevin Arnold) and has given some reasons why.

 Supreme Court of British Columbia:

mentioned  earlier this month, the case of  Aquilini v. Aquilini is proceeding in the Supreme Court of British Columbia.  A decision was published yesterday, penned by the Honourable Madam Justice Stromberg-Stein, on the application of Francesco Aquilini to seal the  court file in his divorce proceedings including, but not limited to, reasons for judgment, court orders, affidavits, and transcripts.

Ms. Aquilini argued that the public interst in having open court proceedings should override the privacy interests of Mr. Aquilini and family.  A leading court decision in this regard is Edmonton Journal v. Alberta, which  states:

In summary, the public interest in open trials and in the ability of the press to provide complete reports of what takes place in the courtroom is rooted in the need (1) to maintain an effective evidentiary process; (2) to ensure a judiciary and juries that behave fairly and that are sensitive to the values espoused by the society; (3) to promote a shared sense that our courts operate with integrity and dispense justice; and (4) to provide an ongoing opportunity for the community to learn how the justice system operates and how the law being applied daily in the courts affects them.

 In this case, an interim order was granted sealing the file, pending the outcome of a two day application for a permanent sealing order (to be heard in August 2012), to protect personal and financial information fo Mr. Aquilini, that he believes may otherwise be open to competitors and news outlets.

 Let me know if you run across any interesting divorce articles to share!


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