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Disclosure: rehab and medical records

Can my spouse get access to my medical charts in a family law proceeding? What about a counselor’s file or records from rehab?

The answer is maybe.

In the recent court decision of K.A.P. v. K.A.M.P. Justice Tindale of the Supreme Court of British Columbia considered a husband’s application for production of the following documents relating to his wife:

  • records from the Paradise Valley Wellness Centre (which is the treatment centre the wife attended);
  • clinical records from the University Hospital of Northern British Columbia; and
  • disclosure of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police file involving the Wife and an incident where she was arrested for impaired driving, dangerous driving and driving over .08.

The wife consented to provide the police disclosure.

In regard to the disclosure of  medical and treatment records, the court considered the arguments of both the husband and wife.

In support of his argument for production of the documents, the husband relied on a previous court decision in which confidential records in the hands of a third party were ordered produced as they were clearly relevant on an issue between the parties and the court concluded that “the interest of the children and the interest of justice outweigh her interest in privacy”.

The wife argued that “the test for the production of documents is whether or not the documents can prove or disprove a material fact.”  The wife argued that as the husband had previously agreed to joint custody and joint guardianship (with knowledge of her “problems”) there was nothing to be gained by disclosure of confidential documents.

The court ruled in favor of the husband, and in favor of disclosing the documents, giving the following reasons:

  1. “In my view, given the long-standing difficulties that the respondent has had with depression and substance abuse and the fact the respondent wants to be relieved of the necessity of having a nanny living in her residence, it is clearly relevant, necessary and material to have as much information available to make this determination”; and
  2. “I also conclude that the interests of the children outweigh any privacy interest the respondent might have.”

Note to family law litigants: your medical history could be considered producible in court proceedings.